Enzo Mari - Pago Pago vase (1969)
I’ve had a longstanding obsession with this reversible ABS plastic vase by Enzo Mari. Its smartest trick is to suggest volume and mass through the sliced section between the two inverted cones, that and the perfect radius framing the top plane. This suggestion of volume helps give this cheap, mass-produced material (ABS plastic) a feeling of greater weightiness and value. An example of anti-logical, counter-intuitive design. 
As a bonus, the US patent is available to view online here.
Take this for a single sentence from the patent:

A container comprising two integrated relatively inverted frustoconical casings disposed one within the other, the inner casing being a complete frustoconical casing and the outer one being a partial frustoconical casing, the smaller ends of said casings being closed and each casing having different shaped cavities, the mouths of said cavities pointing in opposite directions and each cavity having a bottom wall laying in the plane defined by the mouth of the other cavity, the inner frustoconical casing tapering from the larger diameter mouth of the cavity to its closed end; the outer partial frustoconical casing including generally radial walls which connect with the inner casing, said partial frustoconical casing bottom wall and radial walls form a partial frustoconical cavity, the mouth of the outer cavity being a segmental opening larger than its opposite closed end.
Zoom Info
Enzo Mari - Pago Pago vase (1969)
I’ve had a longstanding obsession with this reversible ABS plastic vase by Enzo Mari. Its smartest trick is to suggest volume and mass through the sliced section between the two inverted cones, that and the perfect radius framing the top plane. This suggestion of volume helps give this cheap, mass-produced material (ABS plastic) a feeling of greater weightiness and value. An example of anti-logical, counter-intuitive design. 
As a bonus, the US patent is available to view online here.
Take this for a single sentence from the patent:

A container comprising two integrated relatively inverted frustoconical casings disposed one within the other, the inner casing being a complete frustoconical casing and the outer one being a partial frustoconical casing, the smaller ends of said casings being closed and each casing having different shaped cavities, the mouths of said cavities pointing in opposite directions and each cavity having a bottom wall laying in the plane defined by the mouth of the other cavity, the inner frustoconical casing tapering from the larger diameter mouth of the cavity to its closed end; the outer partial frustoconical casing including generally radial walls which connect with the inner casing, said partial frustoconical casing bottom wall and radial walls form a partial frustoconical cavity, the mouth of the outer cavity being a segmental opening larger than its opposite closed end.
Zoom Info
Enzo Mari - Pago Pago vase (1969)
I’ve had a longstanding obsession with this reversible ABS plastic vase by Enzo Mari. Its smartest trick is to suggest volume and mass through the sliced section between the two inverted cones, that and the perfect radius framing the top plane. This suggestion of volume helps give this cheap, mass-produced material (ABS plastic) a feeling of greater weightiness and value. An example of anti-logical, counter-intuitive design. 
As a bonus, the US patent is available to view online here.
Take this for a single sentence from the patent:

A container comprising two integrated relatively inverted frustoconical casings disposed one within the other, the inner casing being a complete frustoconical casing and the outer one being a partial frustoconical casing, the smaller ends of said casings being closed and each casing having different shaped cavities, the mouths of said cavities pointing in opposite directions and each cavity having a bottom wall laying in the plane defined by the mouth of the other cavity, the inner frustoconical casing tapering from the larger diameter mouth of the cavity to its closed end; the outer partial frustoconical casing including generally radial walls which connect with the inner casing, said partial frustoconical casing bottom wall and radial walls form a partial frustoconical cavity, the mouth of the outer cavity being a segmental opening larger than its opposite closed end.
Zoom Info
Enzo Mari - Pago Pago vase (1969)
I’ve had a longstanding obsession with this reversible ABS plastic vase by Enzo Mari. Its smartest trick is to suggest volume and mass through the sliced section between the two inverted cones, that and the perfect radius framing the top plane. This suggestion of volume helps give this cheap, mass-produced material (ABS plastic) a feeling of greater weightiness and value. An example of anti-logical, counter-intuitive design. 
As a bonus, the US patent is available to view online here.
Take this for a single sentence from the patent:

A container comprising two integrated relatively inverted frustoconical casings disposed one within the other, the inner casing being a complete frustoconical casing and the outer one being a partial frustoconical casing, the smaller ends of said casings being closed and each casing having different shaped cavities, the mouths of said cavities pointing in opposite directions and each cavity having a bottom wall laying in the plane defined by the mouth of the other cavity, the inner frustoconical casing tapering from the larger diameter mouth of the cavity to its closed end; the outer partial frustoconical casing including generally radial walls which connect with the inner casing, said partial frustoconical casing bottom wall and radial walls form a partial frustoconical cavity, the mouth of the outer cavity being a segmental opening larger than its opposite closed end.
Zoom Info

Enzo Mari - Pago Pago vase (1969)

I’ve had a longstanding obsession with this reversible ABS plastic vase by Enzo Mari. Its smartest trick is to suggest volume and mass through the sliced section between the two inverted cones, that and the perfect radius framing the top plane. This suggestion of volume helps give this cheap, mass-produced material (ABS plastic) a feeling of greater weightiness and value. An example of anti-logical, counter-intuitive design. 

As a bonus, the US patent is available to view online here.

Take this for a single sentence from the patent:

A container comprising two integrated relatively inverted frustoconical casings disposed one within the other, the inner casing being a complete frustoconical casing and the outer one being a partial frustoconical casing, the smaller ends of said casings being closed and each casing having different shaped cavities, the mouths of said cavities pointing in opposite directions and each cavity having a bottom wall laying in the plane defined by the mouth of the other cavity, the inner frustoconical casing tapering from the larger diameter mouth of the cavity to its closed end; the outer partial frustoconical casing including generally radial walls which connect with the inner casing, said partial frustoconical casing bottom wall and radial walls form a partial frustoconical cavity, the mouth of the outer cavity being a segmental opening larger than its opposite closed end.

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